Archive for January, 2011

January 25, 2011

Modern Genocide

38 years ago, a law went into effect that made it perfectly “okay,” by the standards of our laws and government, to kill innocent human beings. Astounding, right? And we have been β€” systematically, through a “common medical procedure.” It is genocide β€” right here, right now. It’s ageist, it’s prejudice, and it’s selfish. It’s also extremely offensive to me, personally. And here’s why.

If you REALLY want to be pro-life about things, it’s a go all the way sort of issue. Take out “innocent” and by the logic of our laws, it is okay to kill human life if they’re guity or deserving. Period. No need for second chances, compassion, or forgiveness. And that’s ridiculous. But that’s for another blog post.

Even those who warrant no punishment, who have done no harm to society, and who deserve protection β€” the same for any innocent citizen β€” BY LAW are not protected. They are falsely accused for infringing on a woman’s personal space and autonomy, though they didn’t ask to be there. They are blamed for causing hardship, poverty, and discomfort, though they didn’t put forth effort to do so. They are de-humanized and treated as property, though they themselves are the future citizens of our society. Laws that are made to protect peace and justice do not serve them well β€” where is justice in punishing the innocent? They are not protected; they are put to death.

And that is an injustice. We are not God, we cannot create human life out of nothing. If we cannot create it, we have no right to destroy it.

Prochoice seems to have a problem with the word “right.” By definition, a “right” is a legal entitlement. But the definition doesn’t stop there. A “right” is also that which is morally correct, just, and honorable. I’m not a philosopher, but aren’t there laws about contradiction? Or even, “the whole truth and nothing but the truth”? So how can a “legal entitlement” that is immoral, unjust, and dishonorable actually be… well… a right? In fact, an antonym of the noun form of “right” are “injustice, inequity, wrong.” The pro-choice argument for legalized abortion sounds far more like a “want” to me. “I have the right desire to abort the fetus in my body if I so choose.” They’re very confused.

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January 25, 2011

Meaningful… on Facebook?

The following is part of the argument I made to a stranger on facebook, through a mutual friend’s apathetic comment about life:

“is the pro-life/pro-choice argument STILL going on?!? Wow. Note: people, believe what you want to believe, and don’t try to force your beliefs down everyone’s throat. Worry about saving your own soul, and I’ll worry about mine.”

My response, though I am not usually one to pursue argument, was that justice demands action. Silence only abets more injustice.

This stranger, a guy I do not know and have never met, challenged that statement. His point of view is such that “in [his] mind anti-choice means pro-child abuse.” We eventually got to the point that he doesn’t believe a zygote is a human being that has personhood and identity. By “some cells being terminated,” you save the mother and the rest of society from “damnation and suffering.”

In the face of such insults as “arbitrary religious conviction” or vagueness of opinion founded on the notion that “the world is not A or B, black or white, right or wrong,” the Holy Spirit somehow gave me the balls to continue to fight. [[Sidenote: I still don’t understand when or why I became so adamant about defending life, but I have a feeling it has something to do with the overwhelming ways God worked in my heart this summer. Either that, or when you become dedicated to Our Lady, the defender of all life, you do what she asks… and she commands we fight for life. Either way, it still blows my mind when I find myself to be the one speaking or typing in these arguments.]]

For length’s sake, I’m only posting the last three exchanges: me, him, and my response. I feel like they are the ones at the heart of the matter… and also illustrate to me the hopelessness, confusion, and apathy of the pro-choice point of view.

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January 13, 2011

God’s Coffee

My mom forwarded me this story, and I think it’s worth sharing:

A group of alumni, highly established in their careers, got together to visit their old university professor. Conversation soon turned into complaints about stress in work and in life.

Offering his guests coffee, the professor went to the kitchen and returned with a large pot of coffee and an assortment of cups β€” porcelain, plastic, glass, crystal. Some were plain, some expensive, and some exquisite. He told them to help themselves to the coffee.

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